4 Ways to Prepare Your Garden for Fall

We’re heading into the fall season, and that means cooler weather is on its way. This is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors, tend to your garden and improve your home’s curb appeal — all in one fell swoop.

Are you looking forward to spending some time sprucing up your yard and preparing your garden for autumn? Be sure to add these four tasks to your to-do list before getting started:

  • Start With the Basics: Pull up weeds, dig out your annual or seasonal bulbs, and clear out any leaves, dead plants and debris. You should also spend some time tilling the soil before adding new soil and mulch.

  • Prep for the Elements: You’ll want to invest in garden covers, which help guard against pests and colder temperatures. If you have an automatic sprinkler system, be sure to adjust its schedule since you’ll need less water when it’s not as hot outside.

  • Add Fall-Friendly Plants: If you removed seasonal plants, you could replace them with some that thrive in cooler weather. Chrysanthemums are a good flower for fall, and if you’re looking to plant produce, kale and cabbage are both smart options.

  • Include a Festive Touch: For even more curb appeal, consider adding some gourds, cornstalks or pumpkins. You can also change out your colorful summer flowerpots for orange- and red-hued ones.

Do you need a loan for a landscaping makeover — or to purchase a new home? Get in touch today to learn about your financing options.

Does your home need extra protection?

You’ve just purchased insurance for your new home. But now you’re wondering if you’ll receive reimbursement if your detached workshop or beloved antique vase is damaged in a fire.

The ins and outs of homeowners insurance can be tricky, but having the right plan to protect your property and assets is essential. You can talk to your insurance agent anytime to set things straight or adjust your coverage.

Let’s go over what the typical insurance plan covers — and what it doesn’t.

  • Covered: Dwelling Protection
    This covers your home’s structure when there’s catastrophic damage caused by fire, theft and more. It should also cover separate structures like sheds, garages or workshops on your property.

    Extra: Flooding and Earth Movement
    If you live in an area that’s prone to earthquakes, flooding or landslides, you’ll need to get a separate policy to cover your home and belongings.

  • Covered: Personal Property
    This aspect of your policy refers to standard household items, like furniture or electronics, that are damaged by a covered risk.

    Extra: Endorsement or Floater
    For high-value items that exceed standard reimbursement limits, like jewelry and rare collectibles, you’ll probably want to extend your personal property coverage.

  • Covered: Liability Coverage
    If someone who doesn’t live in your home gets injured on your property, liability coverage pays for their medical bills or legal fees. It should also cover you if you (or a member of your household) damage a neighbor’s property.

    Extra: Umbrella or Excess Liability
    Think you may need more coverage than what’s provided by your standard homeowners policy? It’s a good idea to talk to your agent about this broader coverage.

Your homeowners insurance doesn’t have to be standard. You can adjust your deductibles, add on extra protection and fine-tune your coverage as your needs change.

Get in touch if you want to know more about homeownership or need an insurance agent referral.

Don’t Fall for These Credit Score Myths

Your credit score plays a vital role in your financial health. It can impact your mortgage options and determine whether you can take out a loan or secure a credit card. Your score could even affect your living arrangements since many landlords use credit checks when evaluating a new tenant.

Unfortunately, there’s a lot of misinformation about credit scores — particularly what raises and lowers them.

Are you concerned about your credit score? Don’t believe these all-too-common myths:

Myth No. 1: Checking your score will hurt it.
A hard credit check will slightly reduce your score. Those generally only occur when you’re applying for a new loan or credit card. But pulling your annual credit report or checking your score through your bank is a soft check, and it won’t decrease your score.

Myth No. 2: Closing an account will help your score.
Your credit history — or how long you’ve had open accounts — plays a big part in your overall score. Because of this, closing a long-standing account can negatively impact your score, especially if you don’t have other long-term accounts in your name.

Myth No. 3: Small balances raise your credit score.
Your credit utilization rate matters: You don’t want to carry a large balance because that can lower your score. But even carrying a small balance when you could pay it off means you’re spending more on interest.

Myth No. 4: Your income influences your credit score.
Your credit score is only based on how you manage borrowed funds — things like credit cards and loans (including car, student, personal and mortgage loans).

Reach out to learn more about how your credit score impacts your options when buying a home.

5 Advantages of Owning Your Home

You’ve spent years handing over your hard-earned cash to a landlord. But what do you really have to show for it?

Life as a renter can be frustrating, as well as expensive. But is the huge financial commitment of homeownership actually a viable alternative to renting? You may be surprised to know that the answer is usually “yes.”

Purchasing a home can be more beneficial than continuing to rent. These five reasons will prove it:

  1. Cheaper Payments: With rental rates on the rise, low fixed-rate mortgage payments can be a more affordable option. And while purchasing a home could require a large deposit upfront, the chances of recovering those initial costs increase the longer you stay in the home.

  2. Tangible Value: Unlike renting, homeownership is a long-term investment that stands to provide a substantial return. Quality properties in sought-after locations tend to appreciate in value. And, as you pay down your mortgage, your home equity will increase.

  3. Community Ties: As a homeowner, you’ll be more invested in your community and have an incentive to get to know your neighbors. In fact, 30% of homeowners make friends with their neighbors — something renters are far less likely to do.

  4. Freedom: Rental properties come with rules and regulations. That often means no painting, no remodeling and — perhaps worst of all — no pets. And even if pets are allowed, you’re likely to be paying exorbitant pet deposits and monthly fees. As a homeowner, you can customize your home at will and keep your pets!

  5. Tax Benefits: While it’s true that homeownership comes with additional expenses, some of those costs might actually be tax-deductible. They may include mortgage interest, property taxes, energy-efficient updates and private mortgage insurance premiums.

And these five advantages are just the beginning — you’ll also enjoy more privacy, less noise and no more pesky landlords. So yes, homeownership can be better than renting.

Ready to become a homeowner? Get in touch for a mortgage consultation today.